University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center

Take On Cancer

Take On Cancer is what we do at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. In a world where 1 in 2.5 people will hear "it's cancer," we want to make sure that you are able to take on cancer too.

Knowledge is everything - stay engaged, informed and prepared.

BRCA Gene Mutations and Cancer

Two genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, if mutated are known to dramatically increase a woman’s risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Men can also carry these genes, and if they have a gene mutation, which also puts them at risk for developing breast and other cancers, though their breast cancer risk is not nearly as much as in women. Here's what you need to know about these genes and genetic testing.

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Walk Yourself to Better Health with These 6 Easy Steps

A simple activity most of us do without much thought -- and yet something most of us could stand to do more of -- walking offers a host of vital health benefits. And it doesn't take much to get started.

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Understanding Skin Cancer and How to Prevent It

Each year there are more new cases of skin cancer1 than the combined incidence of cancers of the breast, prostate, lung and colon. Kelly B. Cha, M.D., Ph.D., a Michigan Medicine dermatologist and skin cancer expert, answers questions about how to best detect and prevent skin cancer.

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Sunscreen Prevents Skin Cancer

It's important to protect your skin whenever you are outside, because of the risk for skin cancer. About 90% of non-melanoma skin cancers and 65% of melanomas are associated with exposure to UV radiation from the sun. One of the best ways to protect your skin is to apply sunscreen. Do you know which is right for you?

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Heartburn’s burn and the risk for esophageal cancer

Heartburn. It’s a symptom that many people experience on a regular basis. What many people don’t realize is that long-term heartburn can put them at risk for esophageal cancer.

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Early Detection is the Key to Preventing Cervical Cancer

One of the most common cancers in women, cervical cancer begins in the tissues of the cervix – an area that connects the vagina to the uterus in women.

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How does your diet rate when it comes to breast cancer prevention?

Are you looking to reduce your risk of getting breast cancer or preventing a recurrence? If so, taking a good look at how and what you eat can be the key. Here are some questions to consider in putting together your own game plan.

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Multivitamin supplements and cancer: is there a role?

It is well known that the appropriate intake of vitamins and minerals is essential to overall health. This is likely the driving force behind the 49% of U.S. adults who are taking at least one dietary supplement. Most people assume that multivitamin supplements are harmless, since they are perceived as natural.

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Eat like King Tut with ancient grains

Ancient grain refers to a grain that has been planted and harvested, without modification, for hundreds of years or more. These include kamut, amaranth, farro, and teff and they deserve all the attention. They are powerhouses of nutrition, specifically rich in phytochemicals, vitamins, minerals and fiber.

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Healthy Eating on a Budget

You don't need to break your budget to eat healthy. It doesn't take any extra time to shop wisely or change your staple foods but these very easy strategies can reduce your shopping budget. And with a few minutes of extra planning, you can further reduce your grocery bill.

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Take a Bite out of Nutrition

Usually articles about improving what you eat focus on diet, which many people think of as one of those four letter words. So, instead of focusing on what NOT to do, the focus of this article is on what TO eat -- in other words, this article is focusing on what foods are "good for you."

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Sugar and cancer: does sugar increase cancer risk?

Although some research suggests that sugar feeds cancer, is it necessary to avoid all foods and beverages that contain sugar? Following such a restriction can significantly reduce your intake of foods that are rich in nutrients that have been shown to fight cancer such as fruits and whole grains.

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The PSA and beyond: An update on prostate cancer biomarkers

There is perhaps no hotter topic in prostate cancer treatment today than the use of prostate cancer biomarkers. To learn more about them, we posed a few questions to Todd Morgan, M.D., a surgeon in the U-M Multidisciplinary Urologic Oncology Clinic.

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HPV vaccine and cervical cancer: Is this the new magic bullet?

Most cervical cancers are caused by the sexually transmitted infection human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV immunization could reduce the impact of cervical cancer worldwide by as much as two-thirds, if all adolescent and adult women were to get the vaccine.

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Young men and the testicular cancer self-exam

While testicular cancer is rare, it is the most common form of cancer in men ages 15-35, according to the Testicular Cancer Society. Generally men in this age group are robust and healthy, so cancer may be something they think only happens to other people. Educating men on the importance, as well as the technique, of testicular self-exam may help to reduce the incidence of this cancer.

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Quitting for Good

Smoking cigarettes is the biggest environmental health hazard facing the world today. Quitting smoking is the best thing you can do for your health, whether you’re facing a cancer diagnosis or not. It usually takes more than willpower to quit. Medications to quit smoking double your chances to quit successfully. If you're seeking support to quit smoking, the University of Michigan’s Tobacco Consultation Services can help.

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Detox Diets and Cleansing Trends

Perhaps you have been thinking about trying a detox or cleansing diet. Is there any evidence these diets are beneficial? That depends. If weight loss is your goal, a detox diet is not the answer. Studies report that very-low calorie diets work for only 20 percent of participants. Detox diets can also stimulate appetite, reduce metabolism and energy levels, and potentially increase stress hormones -- all of which hinder weight loss.

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The Nature of Cancer

Many factors determine the cause of cancer, including a person's health history, lifestyle, exposure to elements in the environment and how an individual’s DNA responds to all of it. Justin Colacino, Ph.D., a research assistant professor at the U-M School of Public Health provides his insights.

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Know Your Environment

Cancer can be linked to our environment, but a large number of cancers can be prevented. Here’s what you need to know.

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Plant-Based Diets: Why all the hype?

Instead of focusing on what you shouldn’t eat or foods to avoid, start including more whole grains and legumes in your diet and, in turn, decrease your risk of cancer and improve your health.

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