University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center

Take On Cancer

Take On Cancer is what we do at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. In a world where 1 in 2.5 people will hear "it's cancer," we want to make sure that you are able to take on cancer too.

Knowledge is everything - stay engaged, informed and prepared.

Lifestyle Changes Women Should Consider to Prevent Cancer

While it is not clear how nutrition and physical activity may relate to ovarian cancer risk, there is strong evidence that a few basic lifestyle changes can reduce the risk of breast and endometrial cancers. The strongest risk factor for both is being overweight or obese. Researchers think that as fat mass increases, estrogen levels do too, so lifestyle changes that focus on achieving and maintaining a healthy weight are key to decreasing a person’s risk of endometrial and breast cancers.

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Genetic Risk Factors for Skin Cancer

Many factors can increase the risk of developing melanoma and other skin cancers. Some of these factors are due to behaviors, like exposure to the sun. However, some risk factors for skin cancers are inherited in families.

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Family genetic counseling can identify children at risk for cancer

As advances in next generation sequencing technology becomes increasingly important in treating adult cancers, the same advances are equally important in managing treatment for pediatric cancer patients. For example, recent work by researchers at the University of Michigan on the Peds-MiOncoSeq study found that identifying mutations present in tumor tissue can lead to changes in treatment recommendations.

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What Cancer Patients Should Know About Preserving Fertility

Ask Molly Moravek, M.D., why she pursued a career in fertility preservation for cancer patients, and she’ll tell you that it’s because her heart breaks every time she sees a patient who has had her fertility taken from her. It's why she built a program in partnership with Michigan Medicine’s Center for Reproductive Medicine and Comprehensive Cancer Center that works with patients facing treatment and their oncologists to preserve the patients’ opportunity to have children once they are healthy.

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Gaining Weight During Cancer Treatment

It’s important to include enough carbohydrates, protein and fat in your meals to maintain weight during treatments because too much weight loss can actually slow down/delay treatment. But, side effects of treatment, including loss of appetite, can make it challenging to eat enough food to get the calories your body needs.

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Finding a Clinical Trial That is Right for You

Enrolling in a clinical trial is a treatment option that can be beneficial for both the patient and others who can benefit from the findings. Almost all current treatments started out being tested in clinical trials. Medicine would not advance without the use of trials and people to participate in them.

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My doctor wants me to have brachytherapy

Brachytherapy is sometimes a preferred method of treatment, depending on your physician’s advice, because of its precision. Rather than using a machine such as a linear accelerator outside of the body to direct radiation through healthy tissue to get to the cancerous cells, brachytherapy radiation is implanted inside the body either temporarily or permanently, depending on the type and location of the cancer.

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Medical assistant's cancer opens a door

Mimi Schork, a breast cancer survivor, used her diagnosis to move her toward a healthier lifestyle -- and led her to get involved in the American Cancer Society's Making Strides Against Breast Cancer.

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Men and Breast Cancer

There is no question that breast cancer disproportionately affects women, but we shouldn't be so quick to dismiss the risk to men. As we continue to learn more about the ways our genes influence our cancer risk, involvement of male relatives in genetic counseling and genetic testing can provide important information for your family's breast cancer risk evaluation.

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Joint Pain: Is it Just the Weather?

Too often people blame the winter weather and extreme temperatures for their new or increased joint pain and inflammation, also called arthralgia. If these same people are patients being treated with chemotherapy, the pain could be related to treatment. Joint pain can be debilitating, and can cause a decrease in daily functioning and quality of life.

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